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Hebrew Word of the Day

אֶסְתֵּר

Meaning: Esther

Translit: Es•ter

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The important names in the Bible were not given in random order. As the story concerning each character unfolds, we learn how it is connected to the narrative, provided that we focus on the Hebrew name. English, Spanish, Greek and Latin, along with all other world languages fall short in demonstrating how: 1. The Biblical name foreshadows the life events of each personality, 2. The Hebrew name both mirrors and substantiates the truthfulness of biblical events and prophecies.

Although reading the Bible in English is also perceived by believers as reading truth, the immediate sense of substantiation, as reflected in the mere Hebrew name is missing from the non-Hebrew reading experience. This is just one reason why it is so important for every Bible follower to obtain some knowledge of Hebrew.

Although the name Esther is entwined in Jewish tradition with glory and bravery, the origin of this name is much less pleasant. Esther is a derivative of the name Ishtar, the Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war, and sex.

The biblical heroic Esther was called Hadassah, but the king Ahasuerus changes her name to a goddess name to better suit her nobility. King Ahasuerus has done the same to Esther’s uncle, Mordecai. He was named after the god, Marduk, or Merodach, as it is mentioned in the Bible (Jeremiah 50:2).

The pagan origin of both names was forgotten throughout the generations, and today Esther and also Mordecai have become common Hebrew names.

The Women’s Zionist Organization of America, Hadassah, was founded during the Purim Jewish holiday of 1912 after Esther, the queen, but after her given Hebrew name, Hadassah (Hdas – myrtle in Hebrew).

The name Esther in the Bible:

“And he brought up Hadassah, that is, Esther, his uncle’s daughter; for she had neither father nor mother, and the maid was beautiful and of good presence; and, when her father and her mother died, Mordecai adopted her as a daughter”

Esther 2:7

The important names in the Bible were not given in random order. As the story concerning each character unfolds, we learn how it is connected to the narrative, provided that we focus on the Hebrew name. English, Spanish, Greek and Latin, along with all other world languages fall short in demonstrating how: 1. The Biblical name foreshadows the life events of each personality, 2. The Hebrew name both mirrors and substantiates the truthfulness of biblical events and prophecies.

Although reading the Bible in English is also perceived by believers as reading truth, the immediate sense of substantiation, as reflected in the mere Hebrew name is missing from the non-Hebrew reading experience. This is just one reason why it is so important for every Bible follower to obtain some knowledge of Hebrew.

Although the name Esther is entwined in Jewish tradition with glory and bravery, the origin of this name is much less pleasant. Esther is a derivative of the name Ishtar, the Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war, and sex.

The biblical heroic Esther was called Hadassah, but the king Ahasuerus changes her name to a goddess name to better suit her nobility. King Ahasuerus has done the same to Esther’s uncle, Mordecai. He was named after the god, Marduk, or Merodach, as it is mentioned in the Bible (Jeremiah 50:2).

The pagan origin of both names was forgotten throughout the generations, and today Esther and also Mordecai have become common Hebrew names.

The Women’s Zionist Organization of America, Hadassah, was founded during the Purim Jewish holiday of 1912 after Esther, the queen, but after her given Hebrew name, Hadassah (Hdas – myrtle in Hebrew).

The name Esther in the Bible:

“And he brought up Hadassah, that is, Esther, his uncle’s daughter; for she had neither father nor mother, and the maid was beautiful and of good presence; and, when her father and her mother died, Mordecai adopted her as a daughter”

Esther 2:7