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Hebrew Word of the Day

מֹשֶׁה

Meaning: Moshe, Moses

Translit: Mo•she

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The important names in the Bible were not given in random order. As the story concerning each character unfolds, we learn how closely connected is the name to the narrative, provided that we focus on the Hebrew name. English, Spanish, Greek and Latin, along with all other world languages fall short in demonstrating how: 1. The Biblical name foreshadows the life events of each personality, 2. The Hebrew name both mirrors and substantiates the truthfulness of biblical events and prophecies. We view this as the biblical name-fate connection.

Although reading the bible in English is also perceived by believers as reading truth, the immediate sense of substantiation, as reflected in the mere Hebrew name, is missing from the non-Hebrew reading experience. This is just one reason why it is so important for every Bible follower to obtain some knowledge of Hebrew.

The name Moshe, Moses is actually a verb. There isn’t an exact equivalent for this verb in English, but if there was it would have been ‘dis-immerse’ or ‘un-immerse.’ It is simply a verb that means “to pick up something out of water” (usually a large body of water such as ocean, lake or river).

Moses’s name, ‘Moshe,’ was not given to him by his mother who nursed him, but by Pharaoh’s daughter who adopted him as a son. The following verse explains why she calls him Moshe, but the reasoning is only meaningful in Hebrew: “And the child grew, and she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter, and he became her son. And she called his name Moses; and she said, ‘Because I drew him out of the water'” (Exodus 2:10).

In Jewish tradition Moses, Moshe, is considered the first prophet and the father of all prophets who succeeded him.

Moshe is probably the most frequent name in the Bible (mentioned over 700 times in the old Testament and exactly 80 times in the New Testament). It is still a very popular name among Jews, both in Israel and the diaspora.

The important names in the Bible were not given in random order. As the story concerning each character unfolds, we learn how closely connected is the name to the narrative, provided that we focus on the Hebrew name. English, Spanish, Greek and Latin, along with all other world languages fall short in demonstrating how: 1. The Biblical name foreshadows the life events of each personality, 2. The Hebrew name both mirrors and substantiates the truthfulness of biblical events and prophecies. We view this as the biblical name-fate connection.

Although reading the bible in English is also perceived by believers as reading truth, the immediate sense of substantiation, as reflected in the mere Hebrew name, is missing from the non-Hebrew reading experience. This is just one reason why it is so important for every Bible follower to obtain some knowledge of Hebrew.

The name Moshe, Moses is actually a verb. There isn’t an exact equivalent for this verb in English, but if there was it would have been ‘dis-immerse’ or ‘un-immerse.’ It is simply a verb that means “to pick up something out of water” (usually a large body of water such as ocean, lake or river).

Moses’s name, ‘Moshe,’ was not given to him by his mother who nursed him, but by Pharaoh’s daughter who adopted him as a son. The following verse explains why she calls him Moshe, but the reasoning is only meaningful in Hebrew: “And the child grew, and she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter, and he became her son. And she called his name Moses; and she said, ‘Because I drew him out of the water'” (Exodus 2:10).

In Jewish tradition Moses, Moshe, is considered the first prophet and the father of all prophets who succeeded him.

Moshe is probably the most frequent name in the Bible (mentioned over 700 times in the old Testament and exactly 80 times in the New Testament). It is still a very popular name among Jews, both in Israel and the diaspora.